Harmony Goldberg

5 Racist Things at the 2013 Oscars

5 Racist Things at the 2013 Oscars
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5 Racist Things at the Oscars

 

#1: 9 Year old black actress of Beasts of Southern Wild, youngest nominee ever, called a c*nt by the Onion.

Onion

We wish we were making this up. We’re not. Like we really want to add another item to the long list of the dehumanization of black women. Thanks, Onion. Quvenzhane

 

#2: There Was No Band to Drown Out Seth MacFarlane’s Racist Comments

Mcfarlane

Come on! Some people had Jaws theme music attack them just because they were saying a long-winded thank you! Yet not even one lonely flute interrupted Seth. Over and over again we were abandoned by a symphony of musical bystanders who forced us to listen to comments like:”[Django Unchained] is the story of a man fighting to get back his woman, who’s been subjected to unthinkable violence. Or as Chris Brown and Rihanna call it, a date movie.” “If you bumped into Don Cheadle in the studio lot, would you try and free him?” (on Daniel Day Lewis and his method acting)”We’ve reached that point where Javier Bardem, Salma Hayek, or Penelope Cruz takes the stage and we have no idea what they’re saying but we don’t care because they’re so attractive.” “Denzel has a great sense of humor.  He did all those Nutty Professor movies.” (on Denzel Washington/Eddie Murphy)

 

#3: White Directors Win Oscars for Movies About Race, but Don’t Use Their Platform to Address Racism

Yay! There’s a private club for white men who make movies about people of color (or star as them, too).  It’s called the Academy Awards. Between the awards won for the movies Lincoln, Argo, and ZeroDarkThirty, the white directors of these films about African American slavery, Iran, and the U.S.-led war on terror failed to grasp that the white supremacy that was so useful in creating their winning dramatic storylines is the very same white supremacy that stuffed the Academy ballot box to begin with. Why can’t these directors be more like Marlon Brando?

 

#4: Invisible in Memoriam: The People of Color the Academy’s Memorial Missed

In case you watched the Memoriam, you might not be aware that people of color live, work, and die in Hollywood, too. Here are some people we wanted to say goodbye to:

LupeOntiveros


Guadalupe “Lupe” Ontiveros (September 17, 1942 – July 26, 2012) was an American film and television actress. Ontiveros acted in numerous films like Selena and television shows. She was nominated for an Emmy Award for her work on Desperate Housewives.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupe_Ontiveros

 

 

RussellMeans


Russell Charles Means (November 10, 1939 – October 22, 2012) was an Oglala Sioux activist for the rights of Native Americanpeople and libertarian political activist. Means was best known for his roles in films such as The Last of Mohicans; Natural Born Killers; and Pocahontas.

 

 


 

ShermanAlexander


Sherman Alexander Hemsley (February 1, 1938 – July 24, 2012) was an American actor, who starred in several movies and television shows. He is best known for his role as George Jefferson on the CBS television series All in the Family and The Jeffersons, and as Deacon Ernest Frye on the NBC series Amen. 

 

 



DonnaSummer


Donna Summer (December 31, 1948 – May 17, 2012)[1] was an American singer and songwriterwho gained prominence during the disco era of the late 1970s. She won the Best Original Song Academy Award for “Last Dance.

 

 

 

 

 

#5: They Didn’t Tell Us the Oscar is Mexican!

Yup, Oscar is from Mexico. Maybe if there wasn’t so much misunderstanding of the role of Mexican immigrants in the U.S., the Academy wouldn’t be so ashamed to claim their roots. 

 

A Single Shining Moment

There was one shining moment for racial justice. Just one. And it wasn’t when Tarantino pointed at Kerry Washington and Jamie Foxx and said, “its all because of you.” It was when the film Inocente won an Oscar for Documentary Short Subject, and the film’s star and subject, a homeless and formerly undocumented teen

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